Gaining trust is key in PR. It is one thing to make people aware of your product or service, but growing your business and revenue over time depends on how much trust you build with potential and existing customers. Google Analytics partners with PR professionals to measure the impact of the investment that they are making in their relationships.

Google Analytics has many tools to learn about your audience.

Google Analytics has many tools to research how your audience is finding your site and whether they come back.

Beyond tracking how many people are clicking on your site, Google Analytics measures your “New Unique Visitors,” or people who have never visited your site before. Ideally, the number of new visitors should increase over time.

Realistically, you will not close a sale or consulting with a prospect’s first visit, so it is important to track your returning visitors as well. Google Analytics helps you measure how many times someone has visited your site and the amount of time between those visits. You also can track “Page Depth,” or how many pages into your website someone ventures, and what content was most interesting to them. Finally, you can measure the “Bounce Rate,” or the number of times that someone left your site almost as soon as they landed on your home page.

It’s PR 101 to know your audience and its needs. It is no different when you are dealing with digital content. With Google Analytics, you can do this by measuring “Sources.” Sources, also called “Channels,” include email, search engines, online advertising, social media platforms and more. For example, “Social Network Referrals” allows you to see if visitors are coming from social networking platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. By knowing which platform your content is performing on, you can focus your efforts rather than trying to keep up superficially with all of the avenues afforded online today.

Finally, you can track what type of device your audience is using to display your content. Google Analytics can help you determine not only how much of your traffic is coming from mobile devices, but also what types of mobile devices. It even drills down on the brand (i.e., Apple iOS). If your content is being consumed mostly on mobile devices, you need to make sure that your content is easily accessible and pleasing to the consumer.

Ultimately, you want people to take specific action regarding your product or service. You can track this using “Goal Conversions.” Even if you are getting plenty of new visitors and social network referrals, you need people converting, or doing the thing that you want them to do. If people aren’t converting, you need to consider why there is a disparity between the people who are motivated to visit your site and the people who are motivated to make a commitment.

If you want to dig even deeper, you can segment your data. For more information, visit https://support.google.com/analytics/topic/3123779?hl=en&rd=1

Gaining trust is key in PR. It is one thing to make people aware of your product or service, but business and revenue over time depends on how much trust you build with potential and existing customers. Google Analytics partners with PR professionals to measure the impact of the investment that they are making in their relationships.

Beyond tracking how many people are clicking on your site, Google Analytics measures your “New Unique Visitors,” or people who have never visited your site before. Ideally, the number of new visitors should increase over time.

Realistically, a sale or consulting will not be secured with the first visit, so it is important to track your returning visitors as well. Google Analytics helps you measure how many times someone has visited your site and the amount of time between those visits. You also can track “Page Depth,” or how many pages into your website someone ventures, and what content was most interesting to them. Finally, you can measure the “Bounce Rate,” or the number of times that someone left your site almost as soon as they landed on your home page.

It’s PR 101 to know your audience and its needs. It is no different when you are dealing with digital content. With Google Analytics, you can do this by measuring “Sources.” Sources, also called “Channels,” include email, search engines, online advertising, social media platforms and more. For example, “Social Network Referrals” allows you to see if visitors are coming from social networking platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. By knowing which platform your content is performing on, you can focus your efforts rather than trying to keep up superficially with all of the avenues afforded online today.

Finally, you can track what type of device your audience is using to display your content. Google Analytics can help you determine not only how much of your traffic is coming from mobile devices, but also what types of mobile devices. It even drills down on the brand (i.e., Apple iOS). If your content is being consumed mostly on mobile devices, you need to make sure that your content is easily accessible and pleasing to the consumer.

Ultimately, you want people to take specific action regarding your product or service. You can track this using “Goal Conversions.” Even if you are getting plenty of new visitors and social network referrals, you need people converting, or doing the thing that you want them to do. If people aren’t converting, you need to consider why there is a disparity between the people who are motivated to visit your site and the people who are motivated to make a commitment.

If you want to dig even deeper, you can segment your data. For more information, visit https://support.google.com/analytics/topic/3123779?hl=en&rd=1